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Developing businesses of the future, better workplaces and better outcomes



At the start of a coaching / mentoring partnership, it is essential to discuss mutual expectations and establish a set of ground rules as to how the relationship will be conducted.

This will ensure that the relationship develops effectively and that the client’s needs are met.

The contract need not be in writing, but it should at least be discussed and agreed verbally.

Also, it is not set in stone – amendments can be made at any time. In fact, you should make a point of reviewing the contract together regularly to ensure that you are both still on track.

This checklist will ensure that you have agreed on the most important aspects of the coaching / mentoring contract with your coachee.

 COACHING & MENTORING CONTRACT

 


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McKinsey report that executives can thrive at work and in life by adopting a leadership model that revolves around finding their strengths and connecting with others.

They have conducted interviews with more than 140 leaders; analysed of a wide range of academic research in fields as diverse as organisational development, evolutionary biology, neuroscience, positive psychology, and leadership; held workshops with hundreds of clients to test their ideas and undertaken global surveys.

Through this research, they have distilled a set of five capabilities that, in combination, generate high levels of professional performance and life satisfaction.

The five capabilities are:

Meaning : Managing Energy : Positive Framing : Connecting : Engaging

 CENTRED LEADERS


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Next time you defend your blunt candor as something noble, consider what you might be covering up and what it’s costing you in terms of trust, authenticity and integrity.

Is it just me, or have you seen a surge in the popularity of “telling it like it is?” Whether it’s a brash, in your face CEO — many of whom boast about their direct, no-nonsense, unvarnished telling of the truth — many leaders wear it like a badge of honor.

But when people learn more about their personalities, their communication preferences and their distress patterns, they progressively back off on their bluster about telling it like is. Why? Because they gain insight into some important, and sometimes uncomfortable, truths.

  • You can be direct without being honest.
  • Telling it like it is often reveals more about our own distress than anything else.
  • An “in-your-face” approach to leadership undermines effectiveness in the long run.
  • Being blunt often reveals lack of skill to use a more effective approach.
  • Healthy conflict with another person is a learned skill that few people acquire naturally.

So, where’s the confusion? The problem comes from failing to distinguish authentic emotions from cover-up emotions.

When people are in distress, they mask their authentic feelings with cover-up emotions. For instance, emotional displays can be deceptive and cunning, appearing legitimate, but they’re often just diverting attention from the real issue. Four cover-up emotions are closely associated with an attitude of telling it like it is.

Righteous Arrogance: Righteous arrogance is often expressed through opinionated, judgmental pushing of beliefs. These people believe it’s okay to tell others what’s right and wrong, and push their pious beliefs. Statements like, “You should know better,” or “Clearly you lack the moral character to be a leader” cover up their own fear of not being up to the task. If these people were truly honest, they’d share their fear that they might not always be right and might not be able to perfectly live up to their responsibilities. This fear keeps them up at night wondering if they are worthy. Instead of owning it, they question everyone else’s worthiness, claiming they are just telling it like it is.

(more…)


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“Half of what happens in your life is not what you do, it’s what some other bugger does. Have a sense of humour and take the rough with the smooth. If your life continually goes up with no knock-backs, you are a freak”

- Sir Stuart Rose, Former CEO of Marks and Spencer

Excerpt from UK Management Today magazine

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Aiming to become a customer-centric organisation is never easy, and it may require a multi-year journey.

In order for an organisation to sustain a change agenda over that span of time, the senior management team needs to actively lead the effort.

What does that mean for those leaders?

The most effective leaders demonstrate three key characteristics:

Communicate "Why" The only way to get people to truly buy-in to change is for them to understand why it's happening. Most executives tend to under-communicate. And when they do communicate, they often focus on "what" the company will be doing and "how" it will get done.

Here are some ways that executives can improve their communications: (more…)


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In this video, Paul Bridle helps you understand how set measures in business can either engage or disengage employees.

 

 


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