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Developing businesses of the future, better workplaces and better outcomes



The latest study of UK productivity has found that most workers admit to wasting at least an hour a day.

Capita Workforce Management Solutions surveyed 250 managers and 250 workers across industries including retail, logistics and construction. Researchers found that only 32% of managers say their business is very productive and 71% don't measure employee productivity at all.

The report found a significant disconnect between the views of workers and managers.

Two-thirds of all employees say they waste at least an hour a day at work; more than three-quarters of

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Job interviews and other business meetings taking place over Skype are becoming increasingly common. You might be able to see one another, but a virtual interview or meeting over the internet is not the same as one face to face and you need to prepare accordingly.

Here are some considerations to help you embrace technology and master a Skype interview.

Dress Professionally
Q. Should you still dress as if you are in a face-to-face interview?

A. Yes – general interview etiquette still applies. The dynamics are different, with body language being the main barrier, so it is vital to make a good impression based on your dress and surroundings.

Don’t be tempted just to dress smartly from the waist-up, assuming that’s all the interviewer will see. As you use Skype more and more you will come across plenty of interview situations where the candidate or the interviewer has had to stand up – that unexpected knock on the door – a mobile phone ringing – situations that can only be dealt with by standing up! Being in formal dress will also help you to feel like it is a formal interview and put you in the right frame of mind.

Pick Your Backdrop Wisely
Q. How much attention will be paid to where you are sitting for the interview?

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A global study from Walking the Talk, titled Managing Behaviours in the Workplace, surveyed 745 people including 189 leaders, and found that only 34% of those in leadership roles believe they are able to influence or alter the behaviour of employees.

This is despite the fact that 78% of leaders thought their organisation had adequately equipped them with the skills needed to have a positive influence on others. And despite 86% feeling confident in creating the right atmosphere to allow workers to behave appropriately. The research suggested this contradiction is due to leaders being more comfortable operating at a macro level – for example putting in place frameworks and policies – rather than dealing with the more human element of individuals’ behaviour.

When it came to who should be held responsible for employee behaviour, 76% thought leaders should always be aware of what their employees are doing, and 69% agreed that leaders should be held accountable for the behaviour of people working for them.Walking the Talk - Managing Behaviours Report

When asked at what point leaders become responsible for employee behaviour, 19% said they should always be accountable no matter what the situation. One in five (21%) thought it should start when a group of employees have behaved poorly at least once before, and 27% saw the responsibility starting when employees have behaved badly on more than one occasion.

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Everyday we connect with and forge relationships with new people.

In those few moments of introductions, you need to be able to capture someone's interest and make them remember you.

An 'elevator' pitch or speech is so-named because it's so quick you can tell someone on an elevator ride and draw their interest before the doors open.

This resource will help you form a clear message about you, so you can easily share it with others.

Click Here

Want to Know More? Visit 

The Art of the Elevator Pitch: Chris Westfall - Click Here


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The Ladder of Inference is a model that was first developed by organisational psychologist Chris Argyris in 1992 and later used by Peter Senge in his book, The Fifth Discipline Fieldbook.

The ladder depicts the unconscious thought process that we all go through to get from facts to a decision for action. It attempts to explain how we tend to behave or "jump to conclusions" when faced with a "situation".

  1. We select 'facts' (although not necessarily consciously) from our data bank of experience, facts, beliefs and
  2. Once we have selected data, we begin to add meaning to it. We interpret, that is, make assumptions about what we see, hear, read, feel and we impose our own interpretations on the data.
  3. Then draw our conclusions from We lose sight of how we do this because we do not think about our thinking. The conclusions feel so obvious to us that we see no need to retrace the steps we took from the data we selected to the conclusions we reached.
  4. Our conclusions become part of our data bank - whether 'true' or distorted, they will influence future thinking.

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Benchmarking is a systematic tool that allows a company to determine whether its performance of organisational processes and activities represent the best practices.

Benchmarking models are used to determine how well a business unit, division, organisation or corporation is performing compared with other similar organisations.

A benchmark is a point of reference for a measurement. The term 'benchmark' presumably originates from the practice of making dimensional height measurements of an object on a workbench using a gradual scale or similar

The term 'benchmark' presumably originates from the practice of making dimensional height measurements of an object on a workbench using a gradual scale or similar tool and using the surface of the workbench as the origin for the measurements.

Traditionally, performance measures are compared with previous measures from the same organisation at different times. Although this can be a good indication of the speed of improvement within the organisation, it could be that although the organisation is improving, the competition is improving faster...

FIVE TYPES OF BENCHMARKING

  1. Internal benchmarking (benchmark within a corporation, for example between business units)
  2. Competitive benchmarking (benchmark performance or processes with competitors)
  3. Functional benchmarking (benchmark similar processes within an industry)
  4. Generic benchmarking (comparing operations between unrelated industries)
  5. Collaborative benchmarking (carried out collaboratively by groups of companies (e.g. subsidiaries of a multinational in different countries or an industry organisation).

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My Life in Leadership - The Journey and Lessons Learned Along the Way by Frances Hesselbein.

Frances Hesselbein has written a rare book. An intimate memoir that moves the reader with the stories of Hesselbein's life experiences, My Life in Leadership: The Journey and Lessons Learned Along the Way also conveys the core principles and beliefs that have made her one of America's most respected leaders.

Hesselbein is known as the Girl Scout troop leader and local council director who took the helm of the floundering Girl Scouts of America and created a thriving and relevant organisation. Hesselbein is a lifelong follower of Peter Drucker. On her first day as executive director of the Talus Rock Girl Scout council, she arrived with six copies of Drucker's The Effective Executive under her arm. After leaving the Girl Scouts, Hesselbein became CEO of Drucker's new Foundation for Non-Profit Management, now known as the Leader to Leader Institute. Hesselbein travels all over the world speaking on leadership, and in 1998 received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award in the United States.

Long before she stood before President Bill Clinton to receive the Medal of Freedom, Frances Hesselbein was a little girl growing up in the city of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, best known for the three devastating floods that occurred in the town's history. Surrounded by her extended family, Hesselbein learned early the lessons that would guide the transformative leader she would later become. The story of her grandmother, who Hesselbein called Mama Wicks, and her fancy vases is a poignant example.

A Gift of Kindness- According to Hesselbe

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