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Developing businesses of the future, better workplaces and better outcomes



This report provides important insights from business leaders on both the various benefits of employee engagement and the ways to increase engagement.

It suggests that employee engagement is not just an optional extra, but should be a critical part of an organisation’s strategy.

The importance of employee engagement cannot be underestimated. Engaged employees are typically happy employees who feel an emotional connection to their employer and who feel motivated to perform at their best.

Engaged employees are more likely to remain with their employers for longer, deliver higher levels of customer satisfaction and, ultimately, boost an organisations’ bottom line.

In summary - employee engagement is crucial in helping businesses boost customer satisfaction, productivity and, consequently, their bottom line, which is why it should be ignored at leaders’ peril.

This report explores the complex concept of engagement and explains why it is essential that every business in pursuit of profitable growth needs to understand fully the fundamental drivers that help engage staff and help them to perform at their best.

To read the full report: Click Here


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The presidential farewell address used to be a big deal. George Washington started the trend in 1796.

For many decades it was considered the most famous speech in American history. Students had to read it and memorise portions from it until another speech displaced it - The Gettysburg Address.

Although the Broadway hit, Hamilton, recently brought Washington’s speech back to public attention, we don’t celebrate presidential speeches like we used to. I wish we would.

Words have the power to move us. Words have the power to inspire us. Words have the power to unite us. The great speechwriter, Peggy Noonan, once wrote, “When big, serious, thoughtful things must be said, then big, serious, thoughtful speeches must be given.”

When President Barack Obama left office he gave a big, thoughtful speech about serious things.

The Smile: Obama walks out with a brisk gait and an easy, wide smile. He makes eye contact with all parts of the room. Research shows that your audience will form an impression about you within seconds, before you say a word. Make your first few seconds count.

The Humour: After a long, sustained applause by fervent supporters in the audience, Obama had to get everyone settled. “We’re on live TV here, I’ve got to move,” he said with a smile. “You can tell that I’m a lame duck, because nobody is following instructions,” he said as the audience laughed before finally taking their seats. (more…)


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SMART

Posted in Resource EXTRA



Too often we don’t spend enough time clarifying what we’re really aiming to do before we move to action.

It’s all too easy to set objectives that are so general that we don’t know exactly what we’re trying to achieve, or whether we’ve achieved it.

A structured approach forces us to think more deeply and methodically about what we actually want. Perhaps the best known of these approaches is the SMART acronym. This is a practical, straightforward tool, which can be used for both professional and personal planning.

There’s quite a wide range of variations in the way SMART is defined, and in this quick guide, we outline one of the most popular.

SMART Objectives - A Quick Guide


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The Confederation of British Industry (CBI) has said that employers need to take steps to “stamp out” sexual harassment in the workplace.

Concerns about inappropriate conduct have been thrust into the media spotlight following a flurry of allegations centred on the film industry and, more recently, Westminster.

While Parliament’s employment structure – in which aides are employed directly by MPs – has presented a number of particular challenges to those who have been the victim of inappropriate behaviour, the CBI is convinced that sexual harassment is an issue across a wide range of sectors.

(more…)


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Email is integral to the way that many of us work. Yet there is no universally accepted standard for its use, which leaves many of us struggling to find strategies that will help us work effectively without also overstressing or causing email fatigue.

This article, originally published in  The Conversation explores how people feel about email and gives hints and tips on how to manage the ever-increasing number of emails we received while at work.

 

There is no shortage of self-help books and time management gurus who argue that email zen is possible. But with so much research being conducted in different fields there is a risk that populist volumes and consultants simply cherry-pick the data and findings to fit their point of view – that is, if their recommendations are even evidence-based at all.

We were commissioned by UK workplace experts ACAS to produce a systematic literature review across the fields of psychology, human-computer interaction and management of the strategies people use to try and deal with the torrent of work email. This approach examines published data in a rigorous way, and after excluding many papers that didn’t fit our sifting criteria, we settled on assessing 42 papers.

From these, we identified a number of themes relating to how email is used today, which were then matched against markers of productivity and well-being. Finally, these themes were sense-checked in a qualitative study with 12 representative participants.

What did we find? It became apparent that there is no one-size-fits-all set of strategies that improve both people’s productivity and well-being across job roles and industries. For example, a strategy such as catching up with email outside of work hours might help people feel more in control of their work, but it does not tangibly reduce work overload – and can create conflict in families where work is brought home.

But we were able to identify a number of strategies that research indicates are generally beneficial, and these can be used to dispel many of the popular myths about work email and how we “should” be using it. Here are the top five work email myths – busted by science. (more…)


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What motivates one person can be a complete de-motivator for another.

It is often said that it is part of a leader's role to 'motivate' their staff - but is it?

Motivation is the word derived from the word ’motive’ which means needs, desires, wants or drives within the individuals. It is the process of stimulating people to actions to accomplish the goals.

Finding out what 'stimulates' people to accomplish goals can, help leaders support people be more fulfilled at work.

This questionnaire, which can be used as part of a team development activity will enable people to reflect on what motivates them at work, which will, in turn, help them to understand how they might better interact with colleagues.

What Motivates You? Questionnaire


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