Newsletter

Enter your e-mail address:

Powered by URI.LV


Tag Archives: 6. People Development



Email is integral to the way that many of us work. Yet there is no universally accepted standard for its use, which leaves many of us struggling to find strategies that will help us work effectively without also overstressing or causing email fatigue.

This article, originally published in  The Conversation explores how people feel about email and gives hints and tips on how to manage the ever-increasing number of emails we received while at work.

 

There is no shortage of self-help books and time management gurus who argue that email zen is possible. But with so much research being conducted in different fields there is a risk that populist volumes and consultants simply cherry-pick the data and findings to fit their point of view – that is, if their recommendations are even evidence-based at all.

We were commissioned by UK workplace experts ACAS to produce a systematic literature review across the fields of psychology, human-computer interaction and management of the strategies people use to try and deal with the torrent of work email. This approach examines published data in a rigorous way, and after excluding many papers that didn’t fit our sifting criteria, we settled on assessing 42 papers.

From these, we identified a number of themes relating to how email is used today, which were then matched against markers of productivity and well-being. Finally, these themes were sense-checked in a qualitative study with 12 representative participants.

What did we find? It became apparent that there is no one-size-fits-all set of strategies that improve both people’s productivity and well-being across job roles and industries. For example, a strategy such as catching up with email outside of work hours might help people feel more in control of their work, but it does not tangibly reduce work overload – and can create conflict in families where work is brought home.

But we were able to identify a number of strategies that research indicates are generally beneficial, and these can be used to dispel many of the popular myths about work email and how we “should” be using it. Here are the top five work email myths – busted by science. (more…)


Leave a comment | tags:



Learning styles were developed by Peter Honey and Alan Mumford, based upon the work of Kolb, and they identified four distinct learning styles or preferences:

Activist, Theorist; Pragmatist and Reflector.

These are the learning approaches that individuals naturally prefer and they recommend that in order to maximise one's own personal learning each learner ought to understand their learning style and seek out opportunities to learn using that style

To understand your particular learning style Honey and Mumford have developed a Learning Style Questionnaire [see Team Leadership Activities] and with this information, you will be in a far better position to do three really useful things [quoting P. Honey]:

  1. "Become smarter at getting a better fit between learning opportunities and the way you learn best. This makes your learning easier, more effective and more enjoyable. It saves you tackling your learning on a hit-and-miss basis. Equipped with information about your learning preferences, you'll have many more hits and fewer misses."
  2. "Expand the 'bandwidth' of experiences from which you derive benefit. Becoming an all-around learner, increases your versatility and helps you learn from a wide variety of different experiences - some formal, some informal, some planned and some spontaneous."
  3. "Improve your learning skills and processes. Increased awareness of how you learn, opens up the whole process to self-scrutiny and improvement. Learning to learn is your most important capability since it provides the gateway to everything else you want to develop."

However, to be an effective learner you should also develop the ability to learn in other styles too. (more…)


Leave a comment | tags:



Learning and development are mutually dependent - as employees are trained, they and the business both develop.

As businesses expand, new skills are required for changing technology, systems, products, or customers.

Development needs can be supported through a diversity of learning from many sources.

Many businesses know that there is a gap.

They know they could do better, but most ask, "Where do we start?"

This quick guide gives you some 'hints and tips' on how you might approach the important tasks of planning and evaluating learning and development.

Planning & Evaluating Learning & Development

 


Leave a comment | tags:



Free Acas Learning OnLine modules provide a useful e-learning resource for anyone wanting to refresh their knowledge and improve their approach to employment relations issues.

Through a series of online courses, you will have the opportunity to work through the theory, explore practical case studies, and test your knowledge through interactive questions and a test.

Acas Learning OnLine packages are particularly useful for managers, supervisors and anyone responsible for improving business or operational performance.

Learning OnLine topics include: (more…)


Leave a comment | tags:



In the quest to grow as a leader and as a person, you need others' help, you need to learn fast, and it won’t hurt to make your own luck.

Yves Morieux, senior partner at strategy consultancy Boston Consulting Group, has developed an index to show how business complexity has increased sixfold during the past 60 years alone. Organisational complexity — number of procedures, structures, processes, systems, vertical layers and decision approvals — increased by a factor of 35.

To learn fast, you must be interested in people and ideas, not just yourself.

“Be savvy, flexible, learn from mistakes and collaborate with well-connected people,”

wrote Shane Snow, the author of Smartcuts: How Hackers, Innovators, and Icons Accelerate Success.”

Those who learn fast build diverse knowledge pools and tap into the wisdom of mentors to raise their game. They are fast learners for whom questioning, thinking and growing is the norm.

Here Are Five Ways to Learn More, Faster
(more…)


Leave a comment | tags:



Giving formal presentations at work may not be a daily activity, so when you are asked to give a presentation you may need to remind yourself of what you need to consider.

This quick guide is relevant to formal presentations as well as informal talks you may want to give during a team meeting.

Presentation Techniques - A Quick Guide


Leave a comment | tags:



Learn from McKinsey about what important factors CEOs are considering to bring the concept of lifelong learning into reality in the modern workplace.

They will help you explore the balance between workforce priorities and how to bring humans back into focus in the world of robots.

...If you are anything like most corporate leaders we know, you say (and mean) the right things when it comes to learning, such as “Our people are our most valuable asset, and their development is a top priority.”

But if you are honest with yourself, you also know that your actions often emphasize financial over human capital, and you may leave it to individuals to find the learning opportunities they need. That worked, sort of, when people spent most of their time “doing” rather than “thinking,” “creating,” or “deciding.”...

To Read More: CLICK HERE


Leave a comment | tags: