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Tag Archives: All Leaders & Managers



In this Inside Quest recording, Simon Sinek gives his viewpoint on the challenges Millennials are having adjusting to work, and what role leaders need to play to enable them to succeed. 

 


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Highly creative or particularly clever individuals can be a welcome addition to a team. They may be able to offer alternative perspectives or specialist skills that other team members may not have.

However, they do not always act as a team player. With such employees, it is important to enable them to work to their particular strengths, while also considering the needs of the rest of your team.

The following framework is designed to help you work with a maverick employee when you suspect their behaviour is proving detrimental to the overall wellbeing of your team. It will help you to address the issue without curbing their particular talents, damaging the professional relationship or the individual’s self-esteem.

It can be used as a coaching tool where you have identified that there is an urgent need to address a behavioural issue. It is important to note that the following process should be used on a one-on-one basis with the individual and not as part of a team session. You may also find, however, that you can apply the stages of the framework to other team behavioural problems such as poor communication.

A TOOLKIT FOR MANAGING A MAVERICK


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Managing your career is an ongoing process. Creating a personal brand and advertising to others what you have to offer will set you apart from the rest and increase your visibility.

This will help you in your present role and with future prospects because when opportunities arise, you will be at the forefront of people’s minds.

Personal marketing is about making the most of your unique blend of skills and abilities and highlighting to others what you can do well. It is about developing and portraying the right functional and social abilities on a day-to-day basis.

Functional abilities are your tangible skills and your ability to produce results. They are the job skills and competencies that employers require. These can be acquired through education, training and experience. You should always demonstrate your strengths, as they are invisible to others if they remain hidden.

Social abilities are your social skills, including communication, empathy, sense of humour, rapport and listening. These are the skills that allow you to relate well to others and make others want to relate to you. These are just as valuable to employers as functional abilities.

Employers Are Generally Looking for People Who Possess (more…)


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Most managers prefer to use a supportive leadership style that encourages direct reports to seek out their own solutions in accomplishing their tasks at work.

But that style is only appropriate when the direct report has moderate to high levels of competence and mostly needs encouragement to develop the confidence to become self-sufficient.

What about the other times when people are brand new to a task, disillusioned, or looking for new challenges?  In these three cases, just being supportive will not provide people with the direction they need to succeed.  In fact, just being supportive will often delay or frustrate performance.

The best managers learn how to tailor their management style to the needs of their employees.  For example, if an employee is new to a task, a successful manager will use a highly directive style—clearly setting goals and deadlines.  If an employee is struggling with a task, the manager will use equal measures of direction and support.  If the employee is an expert at a task, a manager will use a delegating style on the current assignment and focus instead on coming up with new challenges and future growth projects.

Are your managers able to flex their style?

Research by The Ken Blanchard Companies shows that leadership flexibility is a rare skill. In looking at the percentage of managers who can successfully use a Directing, Coaching, Supporting, or Delegating style as needed, Blanchard has found that 54 % of leaders typically use only one leadership style, 25 % use two leadership styles, 20%  use three leadership styles, and only 1% use all four leadership styles.

Recommendations for managers (more…)


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All leaders, regardless of sector, are facing unprecedented levels of disruption and uncertainty about the future reports HR Director Lucy Adams.

In the following article, she shares her thoughts on how to lead through these difficult times.

When running various organisational change sessions with leaders and managers one question would often come up – “when are things going to settle down?” It was understandable, if unrealistic. These leaders were often exhausted, having had numerous complex and frequently competing changes dumped on them from on high. Their people were anxious and they felt unable to reassure. They were trying to manage through the disruption of digitisation, new competition, or the need for greater collaboration, while not letting current quality levels dip and having to reduce costs. Sound familiar? All leaders, regardless of sector, are facing unprecedented levels of disruption and uncertainty about the future.

It used to be so much simpler. Remember the days when you had a 'change management' plan and you could plot it out on an Excel spreadsheet? It had a beginning, a middle and, most importantly, an end, and change was seen as a sequential linear activity. Not anymore. These days change is unending, unpredictable and as linear as a bowl of spaghetti.

So how can leaders gear up to cope with the levels and pace of disruption that is now required of them? We used to believe that if leaders worked more, knew more, planned more, controlled more then they could manage better. The truth is that just trying to do more no longer works. Leaders have a finite amount of hours, energy and resilience and trying to stay on top of, and control, the changes they are required to lead is ultimately futile.

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Every leadership book you read will provide you with a different view of leadership.

To help give you an insight to the most longstanding leadership gurus thinking on leadership and what makes a great leader, we have pulled together a short introduction to the thinking of 8 of the 100's of the old-guard 'gurus' of leadership.

If you want to know about Burt Nanus’s Seven Megaskills Of Leadership,   James O’Toole’s Characteristics Of Values-Based Leaders, Steven Covey’s Seven Habits Of Highly Successful People, Warren Bennis’s Basic Ingredients Of Leadership,  John Gardner’s Attributes Of Leadership,  Stephen Covey’s Eight Discernible Characteristics Of Principle-Centred Leaders,  Max Depree’s Attributes Of Leadership, Warren Blank’s Nine Natural Laws Of Leadership - then this resource is for you!

 

 LEADERSHIP GURUS & THEIR THINKING 


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In this era of massive information, the latest technologies are transforming the way people work and live. Emotional fitness coaching, as set down in Warren Redman’s book, is a piece of new technology that enables leaders to do exactly what the title says.

This book is a good, easy to use, interactive guide to emotional fitness coaching. It is very timely in answering the needs of modern professional life. Warren Redman is an award-winning author, counsellor and emotional fitness coach with a wealth of experience in manufacturing and commerce management. He is a leading developer in the science of emotional fitness and founder of the Emotional Fitness Institute.

Redman defines emotional fitness as, first, the ability to bounce back from the latest setback or challenge. It is a series of mind habits you can learn which make you stronger and more resilient. Like any kind of fitness, the more you practice, the better you get.

The book lets you create a workout plan for your emotional health. The exercises outlined in it are about developing so-called “soft skills” for leadership and management.

The book is framed as a narrative, with a newly-appointed manager receiving emotional fitness coaching. Readers follow the manager’s experience with the coach while completing exercises themselves. They are taken through various situations and the process of identifying a problem, developing a reaction to the problem and creating a solution. There is space included for readers to record their own reactions to the problems outlined in the narrative. This interactive way of presenting things is one of Redman’s real strengths as an author and coach.

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