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Tag Archives: Coaching



This inaugural survey aims to capture the leadership and development challenges that people in organisations face and how those issues can affect the effectiveness of organisations.

It also looks to establish what executives see as the: top leadership challenges facing their organisation most important skills for successful leaders, reasons why leaders fail to reach their potential ¢ most useful training and development programmes, key talent management challenges, including the effectiveness of training and development.

Key Findings:

The five toughest challenges facing leaders today are employee engagement, effective strategy execution, talent management, driving work across organisational boundaries and encouraging collaboration across the organisation.

80% of respondents said change in their companies is mandated by senior management.

10% of respondents said change was driven at a lower level and later “blessed” by senior management. (more…)


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Strategic self-reflection can help a leader expand their viewpoint and decision-making capability, acknowledge alternative beliefs and create a bridge between information and wisdom.

As stated by Talmud, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talmud

“We do not see things as they are; but as we are.”

 

This doctrine from the eighth century speaks to our perceptions and questions our ability to understand people and situations accurately.

In a competitive and fluid corporate environment, executives make decisions based on their experiences and ability to navigate complex change situations. But many leaders fail to look through the lens of the opposing viewpoints and limit their decision quality by projecting only their own thoughts, insights and experiences into a situation without acknowledging alternative angles or beliefs. Strategic self-reflection can enable leaders to create a bridge between information and wisdom.

Executives rarely receive direct feedback, and some may develop a distorted vision of the corporate reality. They likely don’t test their ability to understand organisational behaviours. Consider the following scenario. It’s the last executive team meeting, and everyone agreed to implement a new process. Six months pass, and there is still resistance and limited progress on that process.

During the original meeting, heads nodded in agreement; the new process would streamline processes, but leaders may have missed organisational behavioural cues that indicate disagreement, covert resistance, or a misalignment of agendas.

Leaders should not be surprised at this common symptom of a failed change management attempt. Understanding organisational behaviours is a nebulous task. Employees can see, interpret and understand situations differently even when everyone experienced the same event. Many things influence a person’s perception and how they experience the world around them, such as personal experiences, memories and beliefs. These experiences help formulate how we interpret external stimuli, which develops our personality, perceptions and viewpoints. (more…)


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Leading with Character, Building Connections, and Engaging in Extraordinary Conversations by Gregg Thompson

Great leaders are great coaches. They understand that developing the skills, talents and mindsets of their people is a vital part of their jobs as leaders. However, the concept of coaching can also be confusing. Early in his excellent how-to book, The Master Coach: Leading with Character, Building with Connections, and Engaging in Extraordinary Conversations, executive coach and trainer Gregg Thompson explains what coaching is not.

They Don’t Need a Friend - A coach is not a friend, he writes. Although coaches can be friendly, the purpose of coaching is to challenge those they are coaching — the Talent, in Thompson’s terms — and hold them accountable. A coach is also not a therapist. As Thompson explains, “Coaching is not the antidote for deeply troubled and significantly distressed individuals.”

Thompson also differentiates between coaching and teaching. Teaching is a unilateral exercise, with the teacher imparting knowledge to the learner. In coaching relationships, both the coach and the Talent are learning together.

(more…)


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Do you have someone at work who consistently triggers you? Doesn't listen? Takes credit for work you've done? Wastes your time with trivial issues? Acts like a know-it-all? Can only talk about himself? Constantly criticises?

Our core emotional need is to feel valued and valuable. When we don't, it's deeply unsettling, a challenge to our sense of equilibrium, security, and well-being. At the most primal level, it can feel like a threat to our very survival.

This is especially true when the person you're struggling with is your boss. The problem is that being in charge of other people rarely brings out the best in us.

“Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely,” Lord Acton said way back in 1887. “There is no worse heresy than the office that sanctifies the holder of it.”

The easy default when we feel devalued is to the role of victim, and it's a seductive pull. Blaming others for how we're feeling is a form of self-protection. Whatever is going wrong isn't our fault. By off loading responsibility, we feel better in the short-term.

The problem with being a victim is that you cede the power to influence your circumstances. The painful truth when it comes to the people who trigger you is this: You're not going to change them. The only person you have the possibility of changing is yourself.

Each of us has a default lens through which we see the world. We call it reality, but in fact it's a selective filter. We have the power, to view the world through other lenses. There are three worth trying on when you find yourself defaulting to negative emotions.

The Lens of Realistic Optimism: Using this lens requires asking yourself two simple questions when you feel you're being treated badly or unfairly. The first one is "What are the facts in this situation?" The second is, "What's the story I'm telling myself about those facts?" (more…)


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At the start of a coaching / mentoring partnership, it is essential to discuss mutual expectations and establish a set of ground rules as to how the relationship will be conducted.

This will ensure that the relationship develops effectively and that the client’s needs are met.

The contract need not be in writing, but it should at least be discussed and agreed verbally.

Also, it is not set in stone – amendments can be made at any time. In fact, you should make a point of reviewing the contract together regularly to ensure that you are both still on track.

This checklist will ensure that you have agreed on the most important aspects of the coaching / mentoring contract with your coachee.

 COACHING & MENTORING CONTRACT

 


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