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It is important to frame the team purpose in a meaningful way so that the results the team commits to are challenging and clear, and are goals that the members value and recognise as important.

The more team members are involved helps set individuals apart from their peers and is a useful skill for career progression. High –performing teams invest time and effort exploring, shaping and agreeing on a purpose that belongs to them both collectively and individually.

Members of a team should  agree:

  • what the team is expected to accomplish
  • how progress is measured
  • what problems they need to address

This activity will enable you and your team to explore all of the above.

Setting Our Team Purpose


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In this recording, Paul Bridle helps you understand the difference between a vision and a mission statement and how they should be used within an organisation.

 

 


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The Ansoff Growth matrix is a tool that helps businesses decide their product and market growth strategy.

Ansoff’s product/market growth matrix suggests that a business’ attempts to grow depend on whether it markets new or existing products in new or existing markets.

 

The Ansoff Matrix has four alternatives of marketing strategies: Market Penetration, Product Development, Market Development, & Diversification.

 THE ANSOFF MATRIX


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Constant change is a norm in today’s fast-paced business environment.

It’s become important for companies to respond almost immediately, in order to sustain in a business world where geographical boundaries are continually diminishing; technology is rapidly advancing; customer expectations are ever changing  and the whole world is 24/7 connected.

Agility is one of the most important means to deal with it.

If you look at businesses that are progressing and growing, you will find that it’s their ability to be flexible and nimble that’s been helping them stay ahead of the competition. They are the ones that

  • Are more likely to be first to the market
  • Innovate more frequently
  • Are the best employer brands

Given the speed of market changes, an increasing number of companies, irrespective of their size and nature, are jumping on the agile bandwagon to survive and grow in a tumultuous business environment.

Sticking to the traditional values and modus operandi is not going to help. One must remember that agility is not just about implementing and executing new processes or templates. Rather it’s about developing an agile mindset and empowering people to face challenges without hesitating.

So, what does it take to build a company that’s flexible enough to respond quickly and efficiently to market changes? Well, just thinking about being agile doesn’t make you agile.

So, how do you go about it? Listed below are introductory steps that you need to take to prepare yourself to move towards agility.

Ask yourself these questions (more…)


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This paper, produced by McKinsey&Company, examines what makes public-sector organisations agile in extremely challenging times and what mostly prevents them from remaining agile otherwise.

It also describes techniques of organisational agility that could help large agencies and departments get moving as quickly as today’s fluid conditions require—and how to apply them with an understanding of the public sector’s unique context and responsibilities.

ORGANISATIONAL AGILITY IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR


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In this 'Thoughts on Leadership' video, Paul Bridle talks about how some leaders often change track, seem to skip from one thing to another and how maybe it's time to focus!


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“Customers don’t want a quarter-inch drill bit, they want a quarter-inch hole.” This simple but important insight expressed nearly half a century ago by the legendary marketing guru Theodore Leavitt is too often forgotten by corporate strategists and product developers alike.

Successful innovation doesn’t begin with a brainstorming session―it starts with the customer. So in an age of unlimited data, why do more than 50% of new products fail to meet expectations? The truth is that we need to stop asking customers what they want . . . and start examining what they need.

First popularized by Clayton Christensen, the Jobs to be Done theory argues that people purchase products and services to solve a specific problem. They’re not buying ice cream, for example, but celebration, bonding, and indulgence.

The concept is so simple (and can remake how companies approach their markets)―and yet many have lacked a way to put it into practice.

This book answers that need. Its groundbreaking Jobs Roadmap guides you through the innovation process, revealing how to:

• Gather valuable customer insights

• Turn those insights into new product ideas

• Test and iterate until you find success


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