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Tag Archives: Emotional Intelligence



Emotional intelligence – the ability to recognise and understand manage ourselves and our relationships effectively – consists of four fundamental capabilities: self-awareness, self-management, social awareness and social skill.

Each capability, in turn, is composed of specific sets of competencies.

Below is a list of the capabilities and their corresponding traits.

Self-Awareness

  • Emotional self-awareness: the ability to read and understand your emotions as well as recognise their impact on work performance, relationships and the like.
  • Accurate self-assessment: a realistic evaluation of your strengths and limitations.
  • Self-confidence: a strong and positive sense of self-worth.

(more…)


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This inaugural survey aims to capture the leadership and development challenges that people in organisations face and how those issues can affect the effectiveness of organisations.

It also looks to establish what executives see as the: top leadership challenges facing their organisation most important skills for successful leaders, reasons why leaders fail to reach their potential ¢ most useful training and development programmes, key talent management challenges, including the effectiveness of training and development.

Key Findings:

The five toughest challenges facing leaders today are employee engagement, effective strategy execution, talent management, driving work across organisational boundaries and encouraging collaboration across the organisation.

80% of respondents said change in their companies is mandated by senior management.

10% of respondents said change was driven at a lower level and later “blessed” by senior management. (more…)


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Strategic self-reflection can help a leader expand their viewpoint and decision-making capability, acknowledge alternative beliefs and create a bridge between information and wisdom.

As stated by Talmud, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talmud

“We do not see things as they are; but as we are.”

 

This doctrine from the eighth century speaks to our perceptions and questions our ability to understand people and situations accurately.

In a competitive and fluid corporate environment, executives make decisions based on their experiences and ability to navigate complex change situations. But many leaders fail to look through the lens of the opposing viewpoints and limit their decision quality by projecting only their own thoughts, insights and experiences into a situation without acknowledging alternative angles or beliefs. Strategic self-reflection can enable leaders to create a bridge between information and wisdom.

Executives rarely receive direct feedback, and some may develop a distorted vision of the corporate reality. They likely don’t test their ability to understand organisational behaviours. Consider the following scenario. It’s the last executive team meeting, and everyone agreed to implement a new process. Six months pass, and there is still resistance and limited progress on that process.

During the original meeting, heads nodded in agreement; the new process would streamline processes, but leaders may have missed organisational behavioural cues that indicate disagreement, covert resistance, or a misalignment of agendas.

Leaders should not be surprised at this common symptom of a failed change management attempt. Understanding organisational behaviours is a nebulous task. Employees can see, interpret and understand situations differently even when everyone experienced the same event. Many things influence a person’s perception and how they experience the world around them, such as personal experiences, memories and beliefs. These experiences help formulate how we interpret external stimuli, which develops our personality, perceptions and viewpoints. (more…)


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Conflict is a normal part of any healthy relationship and arises from differences, both large and small. Everyone needs to feel understood, nurtured, and supported, but the ways in which these needs are met vary widely.

Differing needs for feeling comfortable and safe create some of the most severe challenges in our personal and professional relationships. Learning how to deal with conflict – rather than avoiding it – is crucial.

When conflict is mismanaged, it can cause great harm to a relationship, but when handled in a respectful, positive way, conflict provides an opportunity to strengthen the bond between two people.

This activity will help you see your conflict management style from a new perspective. The insights you gain depend on your honest appraisal of the conflict management inventory.

ANANALYSE HOW YOU RESOLVE CONFLICT


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Strong company culture starts with strong leaders. But some leaders may be sending the right--or wrong--signals without even knowing it.

When Alan Mulally became the CEO of Ford in 2006, the motor company's market share was plummeting. The problem was internal: Teams weren't communicating or working towards a unified vision. Mulally turned that around with his leadership.

At weekly meetings, he asked managers to use a traffic light system to indicate their progress on key programs. A green light meant it was going well; a red light meant there were critical issues. At his first meeting, he noticed everyone had green lights. Given the state of the company, Mulally knew this wasn't possible. And he told the managers so.

The next week, the meeting was full of red lights. The problems were finally on the table, and they could get to work--all because Mulally encouraged transparency.

As Mulally illustrates, strong company cultures start with strong leaders. Employees look to corporate leaders to set a precedent in the office and keep them engaged. The problem is that some leaders may be fostering a strong--or weak--culture without even realizing it.

Here are three ways leaders unknowingly influence the workplace. (more…)


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My Life in Leadership - The Journey and Lessons Learned Along the Way by Frances Hesselbein.

Frances Hesselbein has written a rare book.

An intimate memoir that moves the reader with the stories of Hesselbein's life experiences, My Life in Leadership: The Journey and Lessons Learned Along the Way also conveys the core principles and beliefs that have made her one of America's most respected leaders.

Hesselbein is known as the Girl Scout troop leader and local council director who took the helm of the floundering Girl Scouts of America and created a thriving and relevant organisation. Hesselbein is a lifelong follower of Peter Drucker. On her first day as executive director of the Talus Rock Girl Scout council, she arrived with six copies of Drucker's The Effective Executive under her arm. After leaving the Girl Scouts, Hesselbein became CEO of Drucker's new Foundation for Non-Profit Management, now known as the Leader to Leader Institute. Hesselbein travels all over the world speaking on leadership, and in 1998 received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award in the United States.

Long before she stood before President Bill Clinton to receive the Medal of Freedom, Frances Hesselbein was a little girl growing up in the city of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, best known for the three devastating floods that occurred in the town's history. Surrounded by her extended family, Hesselbein learned early the lessons that would guide the transformative leader she would later become. The story of her grandmother, who Hesselbein called Mama Wicks, and her fancy vases is a poignant example.

(more…)


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Teresa Scott is helping candidates secure sustainable employment.

Company: Kennedy Scott Ltd
What it does: Highly regarded supplier of training and employability services to Government
Founder: Teresa Scott OBE, MBA
Founded: 1989
Size of team: Total staff 70
Your name and role: Teresa Scott, Founder and CEO

How did your entrepreneurial journey begin at Kennedy Scott?
I had been working for another organization designing and managing training schemes for young people and blue chip companies and had been pretty autonomous in my role for a few years. I was more or less a one-person operation and thought- you know what? I could do this for myself! So, with the help of friends who backed me financially, I started the company in 1989. Kennedy Scott is now the highest performing provider of Employability support services to people most marginalized from the labour market in the UK.

How is your business challenging the traditional recruitment industry?
Using a bespoke and ‘revolutionary’ assessment process, Kennedy Scott’s trained caseworkers quickly identify the real issues affecting an individual’s rehabilitation and work together to address the barriers impacting the individual’s ability to secure sustainable employment. Through this ‘Circle of Support’, the individual is supoorted with a suite of interventions designed specifically to create a routemap to rehabilitation and employment.

What problems are you trying to solve?
I want to bridge the employability gap for people with disabilities or mental health challenges. We are soon launching a new service for the corporate sector providing advice and guidance to companies wanting to recruit candidates from such backgrounds. We are a catalyst between the candidate and the company, bridging the gap by supporting both parties to get the best from the working relationship. We aim to help candidates in the workplace if they have a health challenge or mental health concerns.

How do you make money?
We run Government-funded contracts, and offer independent advice to companies for a consultancy fee. (more…)


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