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Tag Archives: Emotional Intelligence



This article by Paul Russell, co-founder and director of Luxury Academy London explores what we can learn from the key lessons learned by seven well-known 21st-century leaders.

The leaders identified are an eclectic mix - one of whom you might not have considered as fulfilling a traditional leadership role before now.

1. Warren Buffet on mistakes

Hailing from Omaha, Nebraska, Buffet is (according to the Forbes 2017 List of Billionaires) the world’s second richest man after buying his first shares at just eleven years of age and going on to become the majority shareholder and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway. A key trait of Buffet’s leadership is how candid he is about mistakes.

In an interview with Performance Magazine Buffet said: “If every shot was a hole-in-one, it wouldn't make the game very interesting. You have to hit balls in the woods a few times to learn how to invest and how to lead others to performance standards.”

2. Barack Obama on compromise

The 44th president of the United States was born in Hawaii and received the Nobel Peace Prize in 2009 for his efforts at strengthening international diplomacy.

In his farewell address in 2017, Obama said: “Understand that democracy does not require uniformity. Our founders argued, they quarrelled and eventually they compromised.”

3. Bill Marriott on people skills

Marriott led the hospitality brand started by his father in 1927 between 1964 and 2012 and remains its Executive Chairman. What jumps out from the interview Marriott gave with Harvard Business Review in 2013 is his belief in the power of people skills for a business and recognising them in others. (more…)


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Leadership has been in the spotlight as never before, as people around the world look to their leaders in all spheres of social, political and organisational life. Rather than help, though, leaders often seem to be part of the problem.

When it comes to politicians, fingers are often pointed at the leaders of political parties for failing to provide a clear vision, for their personal moral failings, or for their inability to deliver on their promises.

Theresa May, the UK prime minister, was widely blamed for the Conservative party’s poor performance in the country’s 2017 general election. Her robotic mantra of “strong and stable” leadership was much-criticised.

Meanwhile, a seemingly never-ending flow of news reports catalogue US President Donald Trump’s alleged lies and question his fitness for office. Conversely, there has been a growing trend for politicians around the world to back or block policies for moral, as opposed to economic reasons.

In organisational settings, we often hear that levels of trust in leaders are at an all-time low in the wake of the financial crisis, a series of corporate scandals, and the ongoing challenges faced by employees in securing “good work”.

Although we inevitably hear most about high-profile cases of failure, leadership is not a process that just takes place at the top of the hierarchy. If we want to know about leadership and how it works in an organisational setting, we also need to look at how leadership behaviours and attitudes are diffused throughout the whole organisation.

If we want to know about leadership and how it works in an organisational setting, we also need to look at how leadership behaviours and attitudes are diffused throughout the whole organisation.


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Conflict is a normal part of any healthy relationship and arises from differences, both large and small. Everyone needs to feel understood, nurtured, and supported, but the ways in which these needs are met vary widely.

Differing needs for feeling comfortable and safe create some of the most severe challenges in our personal and professional relationships. Learning how to deal with conflict – rather than avoiding it – is crucial.

When conflict is mismanaged, it can cause great harm to a relationship, but when handled in a respectful, positive way, conflict provides an opportunity to strengthen the bond between two people.

This activity will help you see your conflict management style from a new perspective. The insights you gain depend on your honest appraisal of the conflict management inventory.

Click Here to Download


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It is well recognised that stress reduces employee well-being and that excessive or sustained work pressure can lead to stress.

Occupational stress poses a risk to most businesses and compensation payments for stress

-related injuries are rising. It is important to meet the challenge by dealing with excessive and long-term causes of stress.

This quick guide gives introductory guidance only. Click Here


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My Life in Leadership - The Journey and Lessons Learned Along the Way by Frances Hesselbein.

Frances Hesselbein has written a rare book.

An intimate memoir that moves the reader with the stories of Hesselbein's life experiences, My Life in Leadership: The Journey and Lessons Learned Along the Way also conveys the core principles and beliefs that have made her one of America's most respected leaders.

Hesselbein is known as the Girl Scout troop leader and local council director who took the helm of the floundering Girl Scouts of America and created a thriving and relevant organisation. Hesselbein is a lifelong follower of Peter Drucker. On her first day as executive director of the Talus Rock Girl Scout council, she arrived with six copies of Drucker's The Effective Executive under her arm. After leaving the Girl Scouts, Hesselbein became CEO of Drucker's new Foundation for Non-Profit Management, now known as the Leader to Leader Institute. Hesselbein travels all over the world speaking on leadership, and in 1998 received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award in the United States.

Long before she stood before President Bill Clinton to receive the Medal of Freedom, Frances Hesselbein was a little girl growing up in the city of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, best known for the three devastating floods that occurred in the town's history. Surrounded by her extended family, Hesselbein learned early the lessons that would guide the transformative leader she would later become. The story of her grandmother, who Hesselbein called Mama Wicks, and her fancy vases is a poignant example.

(more…)


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Emotional intelligence – the ability to recognise and understand manage ourselves and our relationships effectively – consists of four fundamental capabilities: self-awareness, self-management, social awareness and social skill.

Each capability, in turn, is composed of specific sets of competencies.

Below is a list of the capabilities and their corresponding traits.

Self-Awareness

  • Emotional self-awareness: the ability to read and understand your emotions as well as recognise their impact on work performance, relationships and the like.
  • Accurate self-assessment: a realistic evaluation of your strengths and limitations.
  • Self-confidence: a strong and positive sense of self-worth.

(more…)


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The link below takes you to seven TEDTALKS that are sure to provoke thought for coaches.  

They are divided up into a week of TEDTALKS for Curious Coaches.

The Co-Founder of TPI, Dave Phillips, once said that he made a habit of watching one TEDTALKS on his iPad every night before bed.  We encourage you to do the same thing this week.

Watch each of the videos with your ‘coach’s hat’ on, or perhaps just your ‘golfer’s hat’.

You’ll see that each speaker’s message contains innovative concepts to be applied to any form of performance and education.

Watch and Learn: Click Here


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