Workforce Agility

The world of work has changed. Successful organisations know something others don’t: slow, steady and consistent no longer win the race.

Competitive businesses today are fast, flexible and – most importantly - agile.

They create fewer obstacles to responding quickly. They take unpredictable, dynamic market trends in stride. They sidestep when necessary to keep moving forward because they’ve built a workforce based on a non-traditional model that is adaptable, fluid and responsive. They adopt simple, cost-effective processes through which they manage a workforce that is both connected and autonomous.

Competitive businesses today are fast, flexible and – most importantly - agile. They create fewer obstacles to responding quickly.

They take unpredictable, dynamic market trends in stride. They sidestep when necessary to keep moving forward because they’ve built a workforce based on a non-traditional model that is adaptable, fluid and responsive. They adopt simple, cost-effective processes through which they manage a workforce that is both connected and autonomous.

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Sales Management at the Heart?

The following article was written by Paul Bridle.

I read an article recently saying that “CEOs who put sales management at the heart of their agenda have captured astonishing growth — outstripping their peers by 50 to 80 percent in terms of revenue and profitability”.

I was a little astonished at this. To me it is like saying, the person that puts organic food
at the heart of their diet are healthier. Probably very true, but the belief that this alone can make a healthy person is ridiculous.

Not five minutes later I came across an article about HR being more effective when it has a seat at the Board and is part of driving the strategic direction of the business. Also a good point but my answer is the same as the previous statement.

Sales are only effective if the strategy is right, the marketing is effective and the organisation has a clear path to its market. This requires engaged people (HR) and good systems (sales) excellent communications (management)….and I could go on. T

here was a time when you could have a sales driven business where Sales Department was the core of the business and everything else was tolerated because sales were King. Those days are gone.

Technology, media and social networking has changed the game. More than this, the public are aware of sales techniques and can see the difference between a sales person and an expert or specialist (or as Apple call their retail staff – Genius).

People do not want to be sold to, but people do want to buy.

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Change Impact Analysis Activity

The implementation of any change will always have an impact on employees, processes and ways of working.

The most important thing to remember is that by identifying potential issues before the change initiative gets underway, plans can be put in place to minimise any possible impact. This simple activity provides a framework which can be applied to any pending change, allowing you to decide how to approach the change, as well as identify and mitigate any risks to your team.

There are four steps to the technique:

  1. Identify where or what the change is going to impact.
  2. Consider who the change is going to impact.
  3. Understand how the change is going to impact.
  4. Determine when the change is going to impact.

1. Where or What - make a list of all the potential areas of your team that could be affected. In particular, consider:

  • Once the change is implemented will your existing processes still work, and will they still be the most efficient way to work?
  • Will anyone in your team need new technology or hardware as a result?
  • Is the change limited to a few people in your team or does it spread across a number of areas?

2. Who - identify all the people that will be affected by the change. Consider:Continue reading

Four Decisions Every Business Leader Should Make

There are plenty of legendary bad business decisions: Blockbuster passing up the chance to buy Netflix and Kodak sitting on the digital camera just two that spring to mind.

But there are also some legendary smart moves: "I'll have the merchandising rights in exchange for a smaller pay packet," said a certain film director George Lucas.What separates good companies from great companies, and good leaders from great leaders is decision-making. And there are four key decisions that you need to nail if you want to see your business grow.

1.Decide… on the right people to work with

No company can work towards growth without good employees.

Google's recruitment processes and incentives, for instance, are geared towards attracting and retaining the best available talent. Hammocks, arcade games and free ice-cream may not be your thing, but just like Google, your staff are vital to your company's growth, and just like Google, you want the best available talent.

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Learning Point: Understanding How to Run an Ideas Campaign

Several major organisations have found ways to generate significant improvements to their bottom line through imaginative ideas schemes and campaigns.

 

 

 

Make it Worthwhile: Numerous organisations operate an employee suggestion scheme - having suggestion boxes - real and electronic, but few organisations would claim that theirs was a massive success.

There is another way to do this and that is to focus on the process for a short period and make it everyone’s responsibility to generate at least one idea.

It is also important to make sure that every idea is recognised with a small token. For example, for the first idea you may be given a pen, a second idea generates a mug, a third idea may lead to a book. The prizes must have some value.

In addition, the originators of significant money-saving/income-generating ideas must be rewarded.

What Do You Need To Do?

  • Publicise the campaign in advance and make sure that it has visible top-level backing.
  • Make it as fun and exciting as possible.
  • Run the campaign over a short focused period, e.g. two weeks or a month.
  • Make sure everyone knows that it is their responsibility to submit at least one idea.

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Developing a Strategy – An Overview

Developing strategy, put simply, is about determining where an organisation aims to be in the future and putting in place the framework for achieving this. 

However, developing a strategy is by no means a simple process.

This article provides an overview of three key stages of developing a strategy - Analysis, Options and Selection and Implementation.

ANALYSIS: The aim of the analysis process is to define an organisation’s identity and purpose. An analysis may be based on either:

  • the resources that the organisation currently has and the best ways of capitalising on these (sometimes described as the Resourced-Based View, or an ‘inside-out’ approach); or
  • how the organisation positions itself within its industry, relative to its competitors (sometimes described as the Positioning View, or an ‘outside-in’ approach)

The process of analysis can itself be broken down into three sub-sections:

  1. Purpose - an organisation’s strategic aim or eventual goal
  2. Environment - the internal and external factors that will affect an organisation in pursuit of its strategic purpose
  3. Capabilities - the way in which an organisation goes about achieving its strategic purposeContinue reading