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Tag Archives: Improvement



Benchmarking is a systematic tool that allows a company to determine whether its performance of organisational processes and activities represent the best practices.

Benchmarking models are used to determine how well a business unit, division, organisation or corporation is performing compared with other similar organisations.

A benchmark is a point of reference for a measurement. The term 'benchmark' presumably originates from the practice of making dimensional height measurements of an object on a workbench using a gradual scale or similar

The term 'benchmark' presumably originates from the practice of making dimensional height measurements of an object on a workbench using a gradual scale or similar tool and using the surface of the workbench as the origin for the measurements.

Traditionally, performance measures are compared with previous measures from the same organisation at different times. Although this can be a good indication of the speed of improvement within the organisation, it could be that although the organisation is improving, the competition is improving faster...

FIVE TYPES OF BENCHMARKING

  1. Internal benchmarking (benchmark within a corporation, for example between business units)
  2. Competitive benchmarking (benchmark performance or processes with competitors)
  3. Functional benchmarking (benchmark similar processes within an industry)
  4. Generic benchmarking (comparing operations between unrelated industries)
  5. Collaborative benchmarking (carried out collaboratively by groups of companies (e.g. subsidiaries of a multinational in different countries or an industry organisation).

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The world of work has changed. Successful organisations know something others don’t: slow, steady and consistent no longer win the race.

Competitive businesses today are fast, flexible and – most importantly - agile.

They create fewer obstacles to responding quickly. They take unpredictable, dynamic market trends in stride. They sidestep when necessary to keep moving forward because they’ve built a workforce based on a non-traditional model that is adaptable, fluid and responsive. They adopt simple, cost-effective processes through which they manage a workforce that is both connected and autonomous.

Competitive businesses today are fast, flexible and – most importantly - agile. They create fewer obstacles to responding quickly.

They take unpredictable, dynamic market trends in stride. They sidestep when necessary to keep moving forward because they’ve built a workforce based on a non- (more…)


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This CIPD report provides practical examples of how organisations have approached transformational change.

It contains three sections which refer to examples from the four case studies and focus on:

1 the key themes identified from the four case study organisations on how to land transformational change

2 how approaches to transformation have changed

3 how the roles of HR, OD and L&D in transformation have changed.

The report concludes with recommendations for landing transformational change. The appendix contains detailed case studies of the four transformation processes studied in BBC Worldwide, HMRC, News UK and Zurich UK Life.

To download the report Click Here


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SMART

Posted in Resource EXTRA



Too often we don’t spend enough time clarifying what we’re really aiming to do before we move to action. It’s all too easy to set objectives that are so general that we don’t know exactly what we’re trying to achieve, or whether we’ve achieved it.

SMART objectives

A structured approach forces us to think more deeply and methodically about what we actually want. Perhaps the best known of these approaches is the SMART acronym. This is a practical, straightforward tool, which can be used for both professional and personal planning.

There’s quite a wide range of variations in the way SMART is defined, and in this quick guide, we outline one of the most popular.

SMART Objectives - A Quick Guide


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The critical first step in designing and leading successful large-scale change is to fully understand the dynamics and performance of the enterprise. It’s simply impossible to prescribe the appropriate remedy without first diagnosing the nature and intensity of an organisation’s problems.

Is your organisation's performance as good as it could be? What could be changed to improve things and why would this help? Does the key lie in the work itself? Or with the people doing it? Should you reorganise the corporate structure? Or try to change the prevailing culture?  And why does one organisation seem to thrive on a certain corporate structure or type of work, while another struggles?

The answer lies in understanding the key causes or drivers of performance and the relationship between them.

The Congruence Model, first developed by David A Nadler and M L Tushman in the early 1980s, provides a way of doing just this.  It's a powerful tool for finding out what's going wrong with a team or organisation, and for thinking about how you can fix it.

To find out more about the model and how it can be applied Click Here


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The Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA) produce a range of 'Topic Gateways' which are intended as a refresher or introduction to topics of interest to their members and others involved in the practical application of finance within organisations.

This Topic Gateway explores a range of analysis tools include SWOT and PEST analysis, Porter’s Five Forces and Value Chain Analysis etc.

To download this Topic Gateway Click Here


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The external environment of an organisation are those factors outside the company that affect the company's ability to function. Some external elements can be manipulated by company marketing, while others require the organisation to make adjustments.

Monitor the basic components of your company's external environment, and keep a close watch at all times.

1. The Market: An organisation’s market is about the trading opportunities available to it; including the demand for its products or services. The key players in all markets are buyers, sellers and competitors. The balance of buyers, sellers and competitors significantly affect how organisations do business.

For example:

  • The number of UK clothing manufacturer has dwindled. Many organisations that used to manufacture and wholesale clothes in the UK now just wholesale them (having moved manufacturing to the Far East, or ceased manufacturing altogether). All this is due to cut price competition, while supply and demand has stayed roughly the same.
  • House builders (and private sellers) can usually get high prices for properties when they are in short supply; but have to reduce prices at times when demand is low. This is normally due to supply and demand, rather than to competition between house builders.

2. Economics: There are basically three types of economies: (more…)


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