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Q. What is Project Management?

A. Project management is the science (and art) of organizing the components of a project, whether the project is the development of a new product, the launch of a new service, a marketing campaign, or a wedding.

A project isn’t something that’s part of normal business operations. It’s typically created once, it’s temporary, and it’s specific. As one expert notes, “It has a beginning and an end.” A project consumes resources (whether people, cash, materials, or time), and it has funding limits.

Project Management Basics: No matter what the type of project, project management typically follows the same pattern:

  1. Definition
  2. Planning
  3. Execution
  4. Control
  5. Closure

1.Defining the Project

(more…)


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Change is a common thread that runs through all businesses regardless of size, industry and age.

Our world is changing fast and, as such, organisations must change quickly too and be agile in the marketplace they operate in. Organisations that handle change well thrive, while those that do not may struggle to survive. The concept of "change management" is a familiar one in most businesses today.

But how businesses manage change (and how successful they are at it) varies enormously depending on the nature of the business, the change and the people involved. And a key part of this depends on how far people within it understand the change process.

One of the cornerstone models for understanding organisational change was developed by Kurt Lewin back in the 1940s and still holds true to some extent today. His model is known as Unfreeze – Change – Refreeze, which refers to a three-stage process of change.

However, some 70 years on, the model may appear dated to today's agile organisation because, by its very nature, 'refreezing' isn't appropriate as change is an everyday event and the 'refreezing' of processes and mindsets goes against their culture and business model

 LEWIN'S CHANGE MANAGEMENT MODEL


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In this 'Thoughts on Leadership' video, Paul Bridle talks more about technology and how it impacts on the world of work.


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2017 was an interesting year for employment law with Brexit, the gender pay gap, sexual harassment and the gig economy dominating the headlines and we can expect 2018 to continue in the same vein.

 ELAS employment law consultant Enrique Garcia takes a look at the areas to watch in the year ahead.

The GIG Economy: The future of the gig economy remains in the air as we await further clarification from the Supreme Court. EAT decisions against Uber and Pimlico Plumbers have been appealed to the Supreme Court and the eagerly anticipated rulings will have far reaching implications. Other cases against Deliveroo and City Sprint, among others, are still making their way through the tribunals and this could yet be the tip of the iceberg.

Employment status has long been the greyest area of employment law – is someone self-employed or are they really an employee or a worker? The Central Arbitration Committee (CAC)’s recent ruling that Deliveroo riders are self-employed has thrown more confusion into the arena, although it’s worth noting that this is not a binding authority. We await with interest the Tribunal ruling in the claim brought by 45 Deliveroo couriers to see how it compares to the CAC decision.

Gender Pay Gap Reporting: The first gender pay gap reports are due to be published in April 2018 for the payroll period including the snapshot date of 6 April 2017. Information on any bonuses paid also needs to be published at the same time for the 12 month period ending April 2017. All companies which employ 250 or more are required to publish this information. There is no obligation for companies to explain the gender pay gap, nor any duty to address it if a company is complying with the Equality Act however, as we saw when the BBC published the salaries of its top earners, there can be huge fallout and potential reputational damage where a large gap is shown with no explanation. Furthermore, the best candidates may not be attracted to working for companies with a big gender pay gap if they feel that their gender will adversely impact their career prospects. (more…)


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There are plenty of legendary bad business decisions: Blockbuster passing up the chance to buy Netflix and Kodak sitting on the digital camera just two that spring to mind.

But there are also some legendary smart moves: "I'll have the merchandising rights in exchange for a smaller pay packet," said a certain George Lucas.

What separates good companies from great companies, and good leaders from great leaders is decision-making.

And there are four key decisions that you need to nail if you want to see your business grow.

  1. Decide… on the right people to work with

No company can work towards growth without good employees. Google's recruitment processes and incentives, for instance, are geared towards attracting and retaining the best available talent. Hammocks, arcade games and free ice-cream may not be your thing, but just like Google, your staff are vital to your company's growth, and just like Google, you want the best available talent.

To find the best-fit candidates, you need a process; you don't want to make up your recruitment drive as you go along. But that process doesn't need to be protracted; but it does need to consider the values and behaviours you are looking for needs to be considered – not just the skills and knowledge. (more…)


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