Learning Point: Understanding How to Deal With Difficult People

We have all experienced the dread of attending a meeting where we know 'that person' will be there - the one that always manages to press the wrong buttons.

When dealing with difficult people, stay out of it emotionally and concentrate on listening non-defensively and actively. People may make disparaging and emotional remarks - don't rise to the bait!

When dealing with difficult people, it is important to keep the emotions in check and concentrate on listening non-defensively and actively to what is being said. People may make disparaging and emotional remarks - but don't rise to the bait!

Here are just eight reminders to help you overcome these difficult situations.

Don't Get Hooked !!!

  • When people behave towards you in a manner that makes you feel angry, frustrated or annoyed - this is known as a Hook.
  • We can even become "Hooked" by the way people look, how they talk, how they smell and even by their general demeanour.
  • If we take the bait then we are allowing the other person to control our behaviour. This can then result in an unproductive response.
  • We have a choice whether we decided to get hooked or stay unhooked.

Don't Let Them Get To YouContinue reading

Watch & Learn: Inspirational Leadership

The link below takes you to a  TEDTALKS presented by Simon Sinek on inspirational leadership.

He has a simple but powerful model for inspirational leadership — starting with a golden circle and the question "Why?"

His examples include Apple, Martin Luther King, and the Wright brothers ...

Watch and Learn: HERE

What Kind of Thinker Are You?

Have you ever considered what kind of thinker you are?

It may seem a strange question, but being aware of your thinking style will increase your levels of self-awareness, as well as helping you to work effectively with others.

This questionnaire should help give you a good idea of your preferred thinking style.

It can be used as a stand-alone questionnaire or used as part of a wider team development activity.

WHAT KIND OF THINKER ARE YOU?

How CEOs Should Handle Criticism

Corporate leaders have always been targets of criticism, both from inside and outside the firms they lead.

But these days leaders are getting it from an increasing number of sources, thanks to a bevvy of internet platforms designed to bring more transparency to work, as well as a social media ecosystem capable of spreading word rapidly. 

“The opportunities for negative comments about CEOs to emerge are through the roof,” said Brian Kropp, of CEB, a research firm based in Stamford, Connecticut.

Just ask Oscar Munoz. The boss of United Airlines is the latest example of the perils of CEO critique. Not only did Munoz feel the heat when a video in April emerged on social media showing a United passenger being dragged off a flight by authorities after refusing to give up his seat to make room for United crew members needing to get to a job in another city, but his leaked internal response to his employees regarding the incident quickly drew ire from company review websites, social media and cable news.

While United’s incident is extreme, it shows just how important it is for leaders to be prepared to face such circumstances. Whether it’s a full-blown national scandal or an internal spat about direct reports, CEOs would be wise to develop the skills necessary to take criticism constructively.     

First and foremost, CEOs need to take any criticism thrown their way head on, Kropp said. In most cases, leaders who try to ignore or deflect negative feedback are likely digging themselves a deeper hole, one that could potentially come with serious consequences for the companies they lead.  

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Gain a Leadership Edge by Becoming Your Own Life Coach

From Fortune 500 CEOs to Hollywood starlets to Oprah, people are performing better, making smarter decisions and reaching new heights in areas such as work, finance, relationships and health, all thanks to coaches.

Executive coaching is defined by the International Coach Federation as “partnering with clients in a thought-provoking and creative process that inspires them to maximize their personal and professional potential.” But it can be pricey—as much as $3,500 an hour, with a median hourly fee of $500, according to Harvard Business Review’s “What Can Coaches Do for You?” research report.

Unfortunately, many people don’t have the money to work with a life coach. A 2013 study by Stanford University and The Miles Group shows that two-thirds of CEOs are not receiving coaching from sources outside their companies, and 100 percent of participants wish they were.

What’s the average hardworking American to do? Consider this: Many people want to work with a personal trainer but, unable to afford one, they take matters into their own hands. And if it’s possible to move training out of the gym and under your own roof, does that mean it’s possible to bring other coaching in-house, so to speak, and go it alone?

Many experts say yes. Self-coaching, by applying professional coaching techniques to your own goals and experiences, is not only viable but the ultimate goal that coaches help clients achieve. It takes discipline and dedication, but it can be done.Continue reading

Learning Point: Understanding Why a Good Team Needs a Good Leader

If you want to have successful teams in your organisation, make sure you have successful leaders. 

What do I mean by this you ask?  The way a team is led will have a major impact on the success or otherwise of the team.

What do I mean by this you ask?  The way a team is led will have a major impact on the success or otherwise of the team.

In fact, when I asked team members from within a large financial institution what they wanted from a team leader they identified the following values they would like their leader to hold.

What do I mean by this you ask?  The way a team is led will have a major impact on the success or otherwise of the team.  In fact, when I asked team members from within a large financial institution what they wanted from a team leader they identified the following values they would like their leader to hold.

  • Trust
  • A commitment to their staff as well as the task
  • The willingness to support and serve the team
  • Inspirational leadership, combined with energy, enthusiasm and appropriate expertise
  • The guts to take responsibility rather than pass the buck
  • The glue to make the team come together and operate as a team
  • A willingness to have fun!

I’ll explain each of these in more detail.Continue reading