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Tag Archives: Supportive Leadership



McKinsey report that executives can thrive at work and in life by adopting a leadership model that revolves around finding their strengths and connecting with others.

They have conducted interviews with more than 140 leaders; analysed of a wide range of academic research in fields as diverse as organisational development, evolutionary biology, neuroscience, positive psychology, and leadership; held workshops with hundreds of clients to test their ideas and undertaken global surveys.

Through this research, they have distilled a set of five capabilities that, in combination, generate high levels of professional performance and life satisfaction.

The five capabilities are:

  • Meaning
  • Managing Energy
  • Positive Framing
  • Connecting
  • Engaging

To find out more about how centred leaders can achieve extraordinary results Click Here


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Leadership has been in the spotlight as never before, as people around the world look to their leaders in all spheres of social, political and organisational life. Rather than help, though, leaders often seem to be part of the problem.

When it comes to politicians, fingers are often pointed at the leaders of political parties for failing to provide a clear vision, for their personal moral failings, or for their inability to deliver on their promises.

Theresa May, the UK prime minister, was widely blamed for the Conservative party’s poor performance in the country’s 2017 general election. Her robotic mantra of “strong and stable” leadership was much-criticised.

Meanwhile, a seemingly never-ending flow of news reports catalogue US President Donald Trump’s alleged lies and question his fitness for office. Conversely, there has been a growing trend for politicians around the world to back or block policies for moral, as opposed to economic reasons.

In organisational settings, we often hear that levels of trust in leaders are at an all-time low in the wake of the financial crisis, a series of corporate scandals, and the ongoing challenges faced by employees in securing “good work”.

Although we inevitably hear most about high-profile cases of failure, leadership is not a process that just takes place at the top of the hierarchy. If we want to know about leadership and how it works in an organisational setting, we also need to look at how leadership behaviours and attitudes are diffused throughout the whole organisation.

If we want to know about leadership and how it works in an organisational setting, we also need to look at how leadership behaviours and attitudes are diffused throughout the whole organisation.


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Receiving effective feedback, both positive and developmental, is very helpful to anyone at work.

Feedback is valuable information that will be used to make important decisions. Top performing companies are top performing companies because they consistently search for ways to make their best employee even better - and providing them with effective feedback is an important aspect of achieving this.

This toolkit can help you and your team colleagues review and develop your feedback skills. It provides you with:

  • Examples of different approaches to giving and receiving feedback, and
  • Tasks and activities that can use with your team.

To download this toolkit, click on the following link: Feedback Toolkit


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Leading with Character, Building Connections, and Engaging in Extraordinary Conversations by Gregg Thompson

Great leaders are great coaches. They understand that developing the skills, talents and mindsets of their people is a vital part of their jobs as leaders. However, the concept of coaching can also be confusing. Early in his excellent how-to book, The Master Coach: Leading with Character, Building with Connections, and Engaging in Extraordinary Conversations, executive coach and trainer Gregg Thompson explains what coaching is not.

They Don’t Need a Friend - A coach is not a friend, he writes. Although coaches can be friendly, the purpose of coaching is to challenge those they are coaching — the Talent, in Thompson’s terms — and hold them accountable. A coach is also not a therapist. AsThompson explains, “Coaching is not the antidote for deeply troubled and significantly distressed individuals.”

Thompson also differentiates between coaching and teaching. Teaching is a unilateral exercise, with the teacher imparting knowledge to the learner. In coaching relationships, both the coach and the Talent are learning together.

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Traditional leadership has been hierarchical, but this one-size-fits-all method isn’t always the best solution. That’s where tag-team leadership comes in. 

At Micron, an international memory and storage solutions company, leadership in the systems solution department is fluid. When a project is identified, one person takes the lead, organizes timelines and meetings, and drives the cross-functional teams’ tasks and deliverables—based on the system issue and the area of focus. The department uses an ARCI model (determining who should be Accountable, Responsible, Consulted and Informed), and the team comes together based on the answers.

The same fluid leadership concept is at play at Indianapolis-based public relations agency Borshoff. Depending on the client, the initiative and the tasks, one member of the account executive team is in charge and the rest of the team falls in line to support where needed.

You might wonder, Who’s in charge? Well, no one person, exactly. That’s because the leadership of these teams changes based on the project and the talent of its members, much like “tagging” the next leader into the game when it’s time. In these situations, leadership is more fluid, less rigid and certainly less conforming.

This type of situational leadership gives new life to teamwork in virtually every industry. Progressive companies are increasingly realizing that the benefits of leadership flexibility outweigh traditional models in certain situations. Even if you don’t think your company is set up for this type of leadership, you can still reap the benefits by making a few leadership shifts in this direction.

Work Is Changing

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A study of 1,000 UK adults in full or part-time employment – conducted by Cascade HR as part of The Conflict Report 2017 – found that differences in working hours or taking on bigger workload sizes are the biggest causes of squabbles for almost 1 in 3 (32%) UK colleagues.

Gossip and rumours were the second biggest issues (31%) followed by friendship groups and cliques (27%). Favouritism in the workplace was the cause of conflict for almost 1 in 3 (23%) British workers.

Salary differences, disparity over wages and promotions have also been known to cause issues for a fifth of workers, who say they have noticed a colleague’s attitude change if they have been overlooked for progression.

Worryingly, just under half (49%) of employees feel their company is effective at dealing with these problems in the workplace.

Oliver Shaw, CEO at Cascade HR, said: “What is clear from these results is that a significant number of conflicts at work are started by colleagues feeling slighted in favour of other people. However, it’s concerning to see the number of workers who don’t feel their employer handles workplace conflict in an appropriate way.”

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It is well recognised that stress reduces employee well-being and that excessive or sustained work pressure can lead to stress.

Occupational stress poses a risk to most businesses and compensation payments for stress

-related injuries are rising. It is important to meet the challenge by dealing with excessive and long-term causes of stress.

This quick guide gives introductory guidance only. Click Here


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